Six constitutional amendments will be on the Nov. 3 ballot in Florida , but one raising the minimum wage to $15 probably will garner the most attention.

Four of the amendments were initiated by citizens and two by the Legislature.

Amendment One: Would require changing the language in the state Constitution to “only” U.S. citizens who are 18 years old or older can vote in federal, state, local or school elections.

A "yes" vote supports amending the Constitution to state that “only a citizen” of the U.S. who is 18 years old or older can vote in Florida.

A "no" vote would keep the existing language that says “every citizen” of the U.S. who is 18 years old or older can vote in Florida.

Amendment Two: Raising the minimum wage incrementally until it reaches $15.

A "yes" vote supports the initiative and the state's minimum wage would reach $15 per hour by September 2026.

A "no" vote opposes the increase and would keep the current legislation that raises it according to inflation. It is currently $8.46 per hour and estimates show it could go up to $8.56 an hour Jan. 1.

Amendment three could end the closed primary system in Florida for some offices.

A "yes" vote supports establishing a top-two open primary system for primary elections for state legislators, the governor and cabinet (attorney general, chief financial officer and commissioner of agriculture).

A "no" vote leaves in place Florida's current system where closed primaries are conducted by each party.

Amendment three requires voter-approved constitutional amendments to be approved by voters at a second general election.

A "yes" vote supports requiring voter-approved constitutional amendments to be approved by voters at a second general election to become effective.

A "no" vote continues making the Legislature enact constitutional amendments if they are approved by voters in one election.

Amendments five and six were placed on the ballot by Legislative action and impact property tax exemptions.

Amendment five increases the period during which a person may transfer "Save Our Homes" benefits to a new homestead property from two years to three years.

Amendment six allows a veterans additional homestead exemption to go to their spouse when they die.

In Florida, constitutional amendments require a 60% majority vote for approval.

Information from Ballotpedia and the Florida Division of Elections was used in this report.

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